Utilizing What Makes You Happy

Originally Posted at Savvy Authors: June 3, 2011

That might sound kind of strange since we’re supposed to write books and get serious about the craft and our plots and getting our butts in the chair to write and…. Well, all of that is true, but sometimes, writers should go with an idea, a character, a plot twist or whatever the spark is that makes them happy. Your story takes hard work to write down, revise, and query. Why go through that process with something that doesn’t thrill you?

I’ve been writing for quite a while. It’s been three years since I’ve had something, anything, published. Yes, I wrote things I enjoyed before, but what is it that I think really took my upcoming release to the next level? Two things. One: I’ve had all of this time to practice the craft while writing several books. Two: I had a LOT of fun writing Techno Crazed. I guess, hopefully, those showed through to the editors and contest judges who picked my manuscript up.

So, how can you utilize what makes you happy? Easy! When I started planning my novella in late December, I threw around ideas. Ideas that made me laugh as well as ones that were more serious and dramatic since the book is pretty dark at times. So don’t think I’m writing a romantic comedy! I love those, but my point is, you can — and probably should — throw in humor to any kind of book. Or what makes you happy in general.

What made me especially happy shaped during the writing. During Thanksgiving and Christmas, there was a video game I played called Fable 3. I really, really loved the game, so when I started my next project, I added in something that reminded me of it. Something other people probably wouldn’t think of unless they played the game and read my book, but if you’re curious… it’s the gnome. Yes, my book is a cyberpunk romance. Yes, I do have a gnome! haha And not just any gnome, but a pretty foul-mouthed and moody one.

Here are some tips for finding and using what makes you happy in your writing:

• If there’s something you find inspiring, think about how you could work it into your novel.
• Add some humor to your novel.
• Take time to enjoy hobbies.
• Read outside your genre.
• Give your manuscript time to breathe before you revise it.

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